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Maker of suicide pod plans to launch in Switzerland next year.

SARCO

The company behind a 3D-printed pod which can help carry out assisted suicide has said it is confident it could be used in Switzerland as early as next year. Sarco commissioned a Swiss legal expert, who found that the machine did not break any laws in the country.

But other lawyers questioned his findings.

And assisted-suicide organisation Dignitas said it would be unlikely to meet “much acceptance”. Assisted suicide, in which somebody is given the means to end their own life, is legal in Switzerland. About 1,300 people died there in this way in 2020.

Both assisted suicide and euthanasia, in which a doctor ends the life of somebody who wants to die, are illegal in the UK.

The current method used in Switzerland is to provide the person with a series of liquids that, if ingested, will end the person’s life.

By contrast, the pod – which can be placed anywhere – is flooded with nitrogen, reducing the oxygen levels rapidly.

The process would make the person inside lose consciousness and die in approximately 10 minutes. The suicide pod is activated from the inside and also has an emergency button to exit.

Daniel Huerlimann, a legal expert and assistant professor at the University of St Gallen, was asked by Sarco to explore whether the use of the suicide pod would break any Swiss laws.

He told the BBC that his findings suggested the pod “did not constitute a medical device”, so would not be covered by the Swiss Therapeutic Products Act. He also believed it would not fall foul of laws governing the use of nitrogen, weapons or product safety.

But Kerstin Noelle Vkinger, a doctor, lawyer and professor at the University of Zurich, told Swiss newspaper Neue Zurcher Zeitung: “Medical devices are regulated because they are supposed to be safer than other products. Just because a product is not beneficial to health does not mean that it is not also affected by these additional safety requirements.”

And Dignitas told the BBC: “For 35 years now, through the two Swiss Exit groups and for 23 years also with Dignitas, Switzerland has the practice of professional accompanied suicide with trained staff, in co-operation with physicians.

“In the light of this established, safe and professionally conducted/supported practice, we would not imagine that a technologised capsule for a self-determined end of life will meet much acceptance or interest in Switzerland.”

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